John Schneider

Has a few things left to say

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Lying in wait
On Sunday - a classic yard-work day - my wife spotted this grape-size fellow lounging in his web, strung among the branches of a mugo pine bush near our house, waiting for a meal.
Can anybody out there name him?

Lying in wait

On Sunday - a classic yard-work day - my wife spotted this grape-size fellow lounging in his web, strung among the branches of a mugo pine bush near our house, waiting for a meal.

Can anybody out there name him?

Filed under John Schneider large spider

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Do, or die
I’ve come to peace  - I really have - with the proposition that if the Tigers don’t win the Central Division title today, and paint themselves into a do-or-die one-game play-off, then they’ll get exactly what they deserve.
Their fate was in their own hands; all they had to do was win the past two games against the last-place Minnesota Twins.
IN DETROIT! 
Instead, they coughed up 23 runs in those two games, and have put their play-off hopes - beyond the dangerous one-game shoot-out - in jeopardy.
If they blow it today, with the much-heralded David Price towing the slab at Comerica, I won’t shed a tear for them. I swear!
(Free Press photo of Tigers manager Brad Ausmus)

Do, or die

I’ve come to peace  - I really have - with the proposition that if the Tigers don’t win the Central Division title today, and paint themselves into a do-or-die one-game play-off, then they’ll get exactly what they deserve.

Their fate was in their own hands; all they had to do was win the past two games against the last-place Minnesota Twins.

IN DETROIT! 

Instead, they coughed up 23 runs in those two games, and have put their play-off hopes - beyond the dangerous one-game shoot-out - in jeopardy.

If they blow it today, with the much-heralded David Price towing the slab at Comerica, I won’t shed a tear for them. I swear!

(Free Press photo of Tigers manager Brad Ausmus)

Filed under John Schneider Detroit Tigers Brad Ausmus

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Whole hog
The Mounted Division of the Ingham County Sheriff’s Department donated two county fair hogs to HOPE (Help Other People Eat).
The folks at Merindorf Meats, in Mason, turned the hogs into breakfast sausage. HOPE founder Tom Cullimore and I picked up 204 pounds of the stuff Friday and divided it evenly between the Lansing City Rescue Mission and the Volunteers of America kitchen.
With the hunting season approaching, the venison will start rolling in soon. Cullimore expects to reach the quarter-million-meals-served mark this fall.
The photo shows VOA worker Bryan bringing home the sausage.

Whole hog

The Mounted Division of the Ingham County Sheriff’s Department donated two county fair hogs to HOPE (Help Other People Eat).

The folks at Merindorf Meats, in Mason, turned the hogs into breakfast sausage. HOPE founder Tom Cullimore and I picked up 204 pounds of the stuff Friday and divided it evenly between the Lansing City Rescue Mission and the Volunteers of America kitchen.

With the hunting season approaching, the venison will start rolling in soon. Cullimore expects to reach the quarter-million-meals-served mark this fall.

The photo shows VOA worker Bryan bringing home the sausage.

Filed under John Schneider HOPE Lansing City Rescue Mission Ingham County Sheriff's Department Mounted Division Volunteers of America

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It’s much better than it looks
in my never-ending quest for new salmon recipes, I found a winner on the Internet this week. It’s called simply “Blackened Salmon” and it comes from Alex Guarnaschelli.
For this one, I gave our Weber a rest, and fired up our big iron skillet.
Ingredients
- 1 tablespoon paprika
- 1 tablespoon cayenne
- 10 sprigs fresh thyme (With no “sprigs” on hand, I used a tablespoon of thyme from our spice cabinet).
 - 1 tablespoon freshly chopped oregano leaves (again, I turned to the spice cabinet)
 - 1 teaspoon kosher salt (regular salt works fine)
 - 4 6-7-ounce salmon fillets with the skin on
 - 3-4 tablespoons of olive oil (the recipe calls for canola, but I didn’t have any)
So you blend all the spices together in a bowl. Then you pour the mixture on a plate so that you can coat the flesh side of your fillets.
Then you heat your oil to the point that it’s smoking. Add the salmon, cook for 2-3 minutes, turn the fillets over, give them another 5 or 6 minutes. Squeeze on a little lemon juice and eat immediately.

It’s much better than it looks

in my never-ending quest for new salmon recipes, I found a winner on the Internet this week. It’s called simply “Blackened Salmon” and it comes from Alex Guarnaschelli.

For this one, I gave our Weber a rest, and fired up our big iron skillet.

Ingredients

- 1 tablespoon paprika

- 1 tablespoon cayenne

- 10 sprigs fresh thyme (With no “sprigs” on hand, I used a tablespoon of thyme from our spice cabinet).

 - 1 tablespoon freshly chopped oregano leaves (again, I turned to the spice cabinet)

 - 1 teaspoon kosher salt (regular salt works fine)

 - 4 6-7-ounce salmon fillets with the skin on

 - 3-4 tablespoons of olive oil (the recipe calls for canola, but I didn’t have any)

So you blend all the spices together in a bowl. Then you pour the mixture on a plate so that you can coat the flesh side of your fillets.

Then you heat your oil to the point that it’s smoking. Add the salmon, cook for 2-3 minutes, turn the fillets over, give them another 5 or 6 minutes. Squeeze on a little lemon juice and eat immediately.

Filed under John Schneider blackened salmon recipe

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Fruit of the vine
As I mentioned in an earlier blog, I’ve recently been involved in building a vineyard.
My brother bought four vacant acres adjacent to his summer home near a golf course south of Charlevoix, and when he and his wife listened to the land, they heard it whisper “grapes … vineyard … wine …”
It also said “lots of hard work”.
Read my Michigander column by clicking on the photo.

Fruit of the vine

As I mentioned in an earlier blog, I’ve recently been involved in building a vineyard.

My brother bought four vacant acres adjacent to his summer home near a golf course south of Charlevoix, and when he and his wife listened to the land, they heard it whisper “grapes … vineyard … wine …”

It also said “lots of hard work”.

Read my Michigander column by clicking on the photo.

Filed under John Schneider building a vineyard growing grapes wine